Pop Music and Culture: CuBop, Up-Rock, Boogaloo and Banda. Latinos Making Music in the United States

Pop Music and Culture: CuBop, Up-Rock, Boogaloo and Banda. Latinos Making Music in the United States

CFA MH333/433 A1

MWF 12-1 CFA (855 Commonwealth) B36

Prof. Michael Birenbaum Quintero

Surveys the musical styles of Latinos in the US. Discusses the role of these musics in articulating race, class, gender and sexual identities for US Latinos, their circulation along migration routes, their role in identity politics and ethnic marketing, their commercial crossover to Anglo audiences, and Latin/o contributions to jazz, funk, doo-wop, disco and hip hop. Case studies may include Mexican-American/Chicano, Puerto Rican/Nuyorican and Cuban-American musics; Latin music in golden age Hollywood; Latin dance crazes from mambo to the Macarena; rock en español; the early 2000s boom of Latin artists like Shakira, Enrique Iglesias, and Jennifer López; reggaetón, race politics, and the creation of the “Hurban” market; and the transnational Latin music industries of Los Angeles, New York, and Miami.

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Tejano Music (2/1)

El corrido de Gregorio Cortés
The background
The lyrics
One recorded version, from the 1950s.


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The great Lydia Mendoza "La Alondra de la Frontera"/The Border Lark. Her classic "Mal hombre" is definitely in the "love stinks" lyrical category.
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"Ranchera" music in general, which would eventually be taken up in Mexican film musicals, was generally  in that mode, as in a well-known ranchera classic that opens with the line "Life is worth nothing" and goes downhill from there.Notice the drawn out vocal lines.
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In film musicals and in other contexts, the mariachi ensemble (not from the northern region) is the ensemble that backs the ranchera. But mariachi is an ensemble, not a style - a mariachi can play anything!
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Tuba-licious village brass band.This band looks like they're playing at a town fiesta.

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Tex-Czechs' polka brass (p. 45). This is the Patek family from Shiner, Texas playing the "Circling Pigeon Waltz."

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More Tex-Czechs,  a polka with accordions - sound familiar?
This music would prove formative in the making of country music - polka was a central part of the sound known as Texas swing...
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Traditional chirimía and drum (pp. 45-46) from Autlán, Jalisco, Mexico:



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Los Tamborileros de Linares, traditional ensemble from Nuevo León, Mexico:

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Narciso Martínez (accordion) and Santiago Almeida (bajo sexto) play "La Cuquita," their first recording, from 1935

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Bajo sexto, by the way, is like a 12-string guitar (tuned in all fourths with octaves or unisons on E, A, D, G, C, F for the music nerds). 

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Last, but far from least - accordion titan (and zookeeper) Narciso Martínez, the "Hurricane of the Valley" and unidentified bajo sexto (maybe Santiago Almeida) player ripping it up at a little bar in Edinburg, Texas in the late '70s. From Les Blank's amazing documentary Chulas Fronteras:

Borderland: Corridos

The US-Mexican border, an open wound/herida abierta or a suture that binds...



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"Los Tequileros"  here played by the seminal norteño group Los Alegres de Terán:
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El corrido de Gregorio Cortés
The background
The lyrics
One recorded version, from the 1950s.



Borderlands: Matachines and Alabados of the Southwest US





Matachines


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Alabados


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Here are links to the amazing audio recordings made by Juan B. Rael on the 1920s and housed and posted online by the Library of Congress. In 1940, Juan Bautista Rael of Stanford University, a native of Arroyo Hondo, New Mexico, used disc recording equipment supplied by the Archive of American Folk Song (now the Archive of Folk Culture, American Folklife Center) to document alabados (hymns), folk drama, wedding songs, and dance tunes. The recordings included in the Archive of Folk Culture collection were made in Alamosa, Manassa, and Antonito, Colorado, and in Cerro and Arroyo Hondo, New Mexico.
Some examples of alabados are:

Friday, January 22, 2016

Played in class 1/22

New York Colombians M.A.K.U Soundsystem (2012)



Also, some old school Hollywood "Latins," Italian-born Rudolph Valentino is his famous tango scene, and Lupe "The Mexican Spitfire" Vélez doing her Latin woman on the verge of a nervous breakdown thing.

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

DPH "The Name Game"

Here is a scan of the chapter "The Name Game" from Deborah Pacini Hernandez's book Oye Como Va. What follows are some examples of the musical genres she discusses.  You should definitely take the time to familiarize yourself with the genres with videos that appear on this page (like salsa or banda). Genres that have links rather than embeded videos (like vallenato) are a bit more marginal for the moment.


"Latin" music
Some"tropical" genres
  • Salsa

  • Merengue


"Regional Mexican"
  • Corrido/Narcocorrido/Norteño


LARAS (LAtin Grammys) website


Tuesday, January 19, 2016